Friday, March 13, 2015

(to) follow through

The big news these days is ISIS and here we see this headline?

The U.S. and Canada may have a tougher time defending North America if Russia follows through on a plan to step up its military activity, according to the commander of NORAD.



Does this phrase, FOLLOW THROUGH, have anything to do with the verb follow?

Sort of, but don't rely on that to explain the meaning of follow through.

Follow through means to complete that task or assignment which you have begun with the intention of completing. In the above example, if Russia follows through on a plan to step up its military activity. . . .


See the following blog post:

Set a goal but didn't follow through? Tips to resetting habits


Here are a few additional examples from the news:

RNC chairman expects to follow through with NBC, CNN debate boycott


If the goal is not a good one, maybe it's good if you don't follow through. Can you think of some plans of yours in which it's a good thing that you followed through? Can you think of some plans of yours in which it's a good thing that you didn't follow through?


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